The World of Hype Man: Costume Inspiration

As the team explores the musical influences and contemporaries for the characters in Hype Man, we’ve also looked at the way these influences might manifest in the costume design for the characters. Below are some of the images and cultural inspiration we’ve been referencing when thinking about Verb, Peep One, and Pinnacle’s personal style.

Kdot, Bryson Tiller, and Chance the Rapper have served as useful reference points for the casual, layered look we’re exploring for Verb.

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Some possible style influences for Peep One include Amandla Stenberg, Venus X, Slim Woods, Willow Smith, and Princess Nokia — people who feel effortlessly fashion forward, or who blur the sartorial lines between masculine and feminine.

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A leading style inspiration for Pinnacle is G-Eazy, whose look is refined and put together, but still relaxed and based on simple pieces and muted colors.

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Friday Playlist – Vol. 3

During our rehearsal process, we’ve been checking out a variety of music videos and clips of live performances as we develop ideas about what Pinnacle, Verb, and Peep One’s performance styles and stage presence might be like. Each week we’ll compile a few selections here on the blog — here are this week’s links!

Kendrick Lamar is incredibly dynamic onstage — the way his body becomes the beat makes for a high energy live performance, and his use of the mic stand as a tool to focus and ground him in the space is worth noting.

Yelawolf has command of his stage, whether he’s walking around the stage during a break or spitting raps at the mic:

Bruno Mars might not be the first artist that comes to mind when you think of Hype Man, but the high energy, the sense of joy, and the use of levels and specific movement to punctuate beats in this performance are all things worth exploring:

This clip of Rezz provides a few different examples of how a DJ might be present onstage — the video is super long, so skip through a bit, but note the way her movements and vibe respond to the changes in the beat:

Friday Playlist – Vol. 2

During our rehearsal process, we’ve been checking out a variety of music videos and clips of live performances as we develop ideas about what Pinnacle, Verb, and Peep One’s performance styles and stage presence might be like. Each week we’ll compile a few selections here on the blog — here are this week’s links!

GoldLink, Brent Faiyaz, and Shy Glizzy all have really different styles of delivery and presence here — it’s interesting to see how those styles contrast and compliment each other as we play with different approaches for Pinnacle, Verb, and Peep One:

Run the Jewels bring a lot of energy to their performance on this DJ Shadow track, and their connection feels genuine and fun:

Noting the way Macklemore and Offset use the stage space in this performance on Jimmy Kimmel is useful as we explore the onstage movement for the Hype Man performance moments.

Post-Malone’s performance on Late Night relies on a lot of lighting and fog effects to create mood and interest, but there’s minimal physical action onstage. Like Pinnacle’s focus on “the grind,” Post Malone’s lyrics here highlight the hard work he’s put in to reach success:

Yelawolf on Race

Yelawolf, a white rapper from Alabama, shares his perspective on race, police violence, and the confederate flag in this radio interview with Hot 97:

The interview is about half an hour — most of the conversation about race and politics is in the first 10 minute of the video (although the interviewers bring it up again toward the end at about 23 mins.)

We’ve been talking a bit in rehearsals about Pinnacle’s relationship to the police and how growing up as a white person around black people influenced his views on race. In this interview, Yelawolf talks about his own experience growing up white in small town Alabama, but he seems uninterested in discussing the privileges his race has afforded him, like why rock radio is more likely to play him over other rappers, and doesn’t want to grapple with the racial dynamics that will come into play for his kids, who are half black.
Later in the video, around the 18 min mark, there’s also some discussion about the way Yelawolf has evolved as an artist — Pinnacle’s growth as an artist and his understanding of his “brand” and the way it’s shifting are interesting to think about in this context. For Yelawolf, it seems his race affords him some genre crossover that might be unavailable to artists of color. How might Pinnacle’s career trajectory as a white artist be different from the other POC artists trying to come up at the same time?

 

Friday Playlist – Vol. 1

During our rehearsal process, we’ve been checking out a variety of music videos and clips of live performances as we develop ideas about what Pinnacle, Verb, and Peep One’s performance styles and stage presence might be like. Each week we’ll compile a few selections here on the blog — here are this week’s links!

Local rapper Joyner Lucas’ song “I’m Not Racist” has been going viral this week, in large part because of the provocative music video — it’s a timely example of how an artist can use their platform to address contemporary issues:

We’ve been watching a lot of G-Eazy — his lyric “that’s not on my brand” especially jumps out here, as we’ve been considering what kind of “brand” Pinnacle is trying to establish.

Rachelle Fuego is an artist mentioned by Pinnacle in a conversation with Peep One — Rachelle is “global” and someone Peep deeply admires. As we discussed what her music and audience might be like, local rapper Dutch Rebelle came up as a possible inspiration for her sound and look:

Yo Gotti’s performance with Nicki Minaj on the Tonight Show features some solid hype man interjections:

Jay-Z in Conversation

T Magazine, the style magazine for The New York Times, just released an in depth interview with Jay-Z covering a range of topics, including the current state of racial politics in America, what it means to be an aging hip hop icon, and what responsibility black artists have to the larger culture.

Kadahj Bennett, who plays Verb in Hype Man, sent along the video of the interview below — we’ve been talking a lot about Verb’s emotional journey, his response to court-mandated therapy, and the way his relationship to music and his role within the group shifts over the course of the play. Some of Jay-Z’s statements here seem like they would resonate with Verb, and it’s interesting to think about how an icon like Jay-Z might serve as a model to younger artists grappling with questions about their place in the industry.

The feature on the NYT website has the full transcript and also includes some cool visual art and annotations — a few excerpted questions from NYT Executive Editor Dean Baquet and Jay-Z’s responses are below, but it’s worth checking out the entire interview.

BAQUET: …Do you expect black people and white people and young people and old people to hear different things in your music? I’m sure I heard some things in that song that you may not even have thought of ’cause I’m a different generation. What do you want a young white kid to hear in that song that maybe a young black kid would not hear?
JAY-Z: That’s a great question. I think when you make music, you want people to hear different things, and then you want it to start a dialogue. Because that’s how we get to understanding. “Oh, you felt that way about it.” “This is actually what I meant, because this happened, and these things happened, that led to me saying this specific thing.”

BAQUET: What was that like, being in therapy? What did you talk about that you had never acknowledged to yourself or talked about?
JAY-Z: I grew so much from the experience. But I think the most important thing I got is that everything is connected. Every emotion is connected and it comes from somewhere. And just being aware of it. Being aware of it in everyday life puts you at such a … you’re at such an advantage. You know, you realize that if someone’s racist toward you, it ain’t about you. It’s about their upbringing and what happened to them, and how that led them to this point. You know, most bullies bully. It just happen. Oh, you got bullied as a kid so you trying to bully me. I understand. And once I understand that, instead of reacting to that with anger, I can provide a softer landing and maybe, “Aw, man, is you O.K.?” I was just saying there was a lot of fights in our neighborhood that started with “What you looking at? Why you looking at me? You looking at me?” And then you realize: “Oh, you think I see you. You’re in this space where you’re hurting, and you think I see you, so you don’t want me to look at you. And you don’t want me to see you.”

BAQUET: Do black artists have a different obligation than white artists? Do you feel you have a different kind of obligation to the people who listen to you than if you were a white musician?

JAY-Z: …I have an obligation to further the conversation and always, you know, our stature in America. Our emotional maturity. And so on and so forth. It’s humbling; at the same time it’s like, you know, it’s what you’ve been charged with in life. And I believe since the beginning of time the poets have been charged with that. Like it was the poets that’s explaining the emotions and making these songs that people like, “Oh, that’s what I feel.”